Calendar

September 2017
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
 << < > >>
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Announce

Who's Online?

Member: 0
Visitor: 1

rss Syndication

27 Oct 2014 

Cracked Heels Diagnosis And Treatment

While there is a lot of awareness about the need to wear diabetic or therapeutic footwear, there is little information available on how to differentiate the real from the phony ones. Foot corn can be extremely painful and can obstruct your day-to-day activities.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain


To soften calluses, corns, and dry, cracked heels—and keep them that way—apply a small dab of Heel To Toe Feels Like New Foot Softener to problem areas before going to bed. The water does not need to soapy or include any essential oils, but you can add these if you would like. The goal is to soften the skin of the callus so that you can treat it successfully. These pads may cause irritation, though, so observe the callus carefully when changing the pad to see if the area appears red or irritated. Rub gently in a circular motion to thin the skin of the callused area. If you have diabetes, avoid using a pumice stone as you risk infecting your foot. She can trim the foot callus in a standard office visit. She may also prescribe antibiotic cream to minimize any potential risk of infection. If the callus has developed as a result of a foot deformity, your doctor can also help you minimize potential recurrence by fitting you for shoe inserts, called orthotics. Soak your foot in warm, soapy water. My HG foot file!


If you have diabetes or another condition that causes poor circulation to your feet, you're at greater risk of complications. Corns are smaller than calluses and have a hard center surrounded by inflamed skin. Corns usually develop on parts of your feet that don't bear weight, such as the tops and sides of your toes. Corns can be painful when pushed or may cause a dull ache. Calluses usually develop on the soles of the feet, especially under the heels or balls, on the palms, or on the knees. Calluses are rarely painful and vary in size and shape. They can be more than an inch in diameter, making them larger than corns. When shoes are too tight or have very high heels, they compress areas of your foot. Repeat two to three times; switch feet.


A clavus is a thickening of the skin due to intermittent pressure and frictional forces. The word clavus has many synonyms and innumerable vernacular terms, some of which are listed in the Table below; these terms describe the related activities that have induced clavus formation. The shape of the hands and feet are important in clavus formation. Specifically, the bony prominences of the metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints often are shaped in such a way as to induce overlying skin friction. Toe deformity, including contractures and claw, hammer, and mallet-shaped toes, may contribute to pathogenesis. First, you had better prepare for a basin of warm water to soak the feet every winter night.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain


A callus is actually a bone problem and a foot mechanics problem, not a skin problem. A foot deformity will cause excess pressure to that area from the shoe or the ground. The body's natural defense mechanism will kick in and start building up the top layer of skin in response to the excess pressure. This is a protective response from the body in an attempt to prevent the pressure from wearing down the skin layers and resulting in an open sore. The problem is that as long as there is pressure, the body will continue to build up the skin. In runners, the most common places for callus buildup are at the inside of the heel, the area around the big toe and the ball of the foot. Calluses can appear on top of the toes or in between the toes. In these cases, the callus tissue is called a corn. The calluses can be thickened, dry, scaly, yellow, red, tender and even flakey. Once the problem is identified, the first step is to treat the cause. Metatarsal pain is a common foot problem.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain
Admin · 258 views · Leave a comment
25 Oct 2014 

Cracked Heels Diagnosis And Treatment

See how much softer and smoother my skin looks in the second photo? Corns and calluses can be painful and frustrating problems in the foot. The stretching foot rocker is a helpful tool in relieving pain associated with lower leg conditions. Alton Beauty has now added Callus Peel to the range of pedicure treatments. Everybody, from school children on can recognize a wart.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain


To soften calluses, corns, and dry, cracked heels—and keep them that way—apply a small dab of Heel To Toe Feels Like New Foot Softener to problem areas before going to bed. The water does not need to soapy or include any essential oils, but you can add these if you would like. The goal is to soften the skin of the callus so that you can treat it successfully. These pads may cause irritation, though, so observe the callus carefully when changing the pad to see if the area appears red or irritated. Rub gently in a circular motion to thin the skin of the callused area. If you have diabetes, avoid using a pumice stone as you risk infecting your foot. She can trim the foot callus in a standard office visit. She may also prescribe antibiotic cream to minimize any potential risk of infection. If the callus has developed as a result of a foot deformity, your doctor can also help you minimize potential recurrence by fitting you for shoe inserts, called orthotics. Soak your foot in warm, soapy water. My HG foot file!


If you have diabetes or another condition that causes poor circulation to your feet, you're at greater risk of complications. Corns are smaller than calluses and have a hard center surrounded by inflamed skin. Corns usually develop on parts of your feet that don't bear weight, such as the tops and sides of your toes. Corns can be painful when pushed or may cause a dull ache. Calluses usually develop on the soles of the feet, especially under the heels or balls, on the palms, or on the knees. Calluses are rarely painful and vary in size and shape. They can be more than an inch in diameter, making them larger than corns. When shoes are too tight or have very high heels, they compress areas of your foot. Repeat two to three times; switch feet.


This condition is usually caused by abnormal stress along the plantar fascia from excessive pronation of the foot. Feet that roll in at the ankle will cause a pull along the plantar fascia, usually at the heel. Repeated pulling will damage the fibres of the fascia and lead to the pain of ‘plantar fasciitis'. Symptoms: Plantar fasciitis often leads to point tenderness on the inside portion of the heel where the heel and arch meet. This pain is usually worse in the morning when you first place your foot on the ground.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain


Well, corns (Heloma) are small and round: they also have a hard thickening bit of skin in the middle and are very painful. They usually affect your smaller toes; and wearing poorly fitted shoes can cause excessive friction and rubbing of the skin to form a corn. When people opt to use products containing Aloe Vera, such as gels and creams, they can prevent and remove corns. Common foot problems and nail deformities in our aging population.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain
Admin · 234 views · Leave a comment
21 Mar 2014 

5 Products for Bunions




5 Products for Bunions

A bunion is a musculoskeletal condition of the foot that causes the big toe to angle toward the second toe, resulting in a large bump at the base of the big toe. The big toe shifts out of position because of a separation that occurs between the first and second metatarsal bones (long bones of the foot). As a result, the forefoot widens, making shoes uncomfortable for some bunion sufferers. Another common complaint associated with a bunion is pain or inflammation at the big toe area where the bump lies. While a bunion cannot be permanently corrected by over-the-counter products, there are some products that may be helpful in alleviating the pain and discomfort. You will find that some products for bunions are geared toward women -- for example, Bunion Support Socks are currently only available in women's sizes. This is because bunions predominantly affect women, although men and children can suffer from bunions too.





Admin · 181 views · Leave a comment
19 Mar 2014 

PodiatryNetwork.com - Cocked Up Big Toe – Hallux Hammer Toe




PodiatryNetwork.com - Cocked Up Big Toe – Hallux Hammer Toe


Description



The big toe, called the Hallux, is made up of two small bones called phalanges. This condition presents as a cocking up of the big toe at the joint between these two small bones. In the early stages of the condition the deformity is flexible, in later stages the deformity becomes rigid. It is caused by a variety conditions. Neurological diseases that cause muscle weakness or muscle imbalance in the muscles of the lower leg can result in the formation of Hallux hammertoe. This is commonly seen in patients after they have suffered a stroke or Cerebral Vascular Accident. Damage to certain areas of the brain during a stroke will frequently result in weakness and/or paralysis on one side of the body. If the stroke is not severe the patient may recover a majority of the function of the muscles in the legs and feet. However a residual result may be a cocking up of the big toe.

Other causes of the condition include damage or laceration to the tendon on the bottom of the big toe. Surgery to correct bunion deformities, in rare cases, may result in an imbalance of the structures about the big toe joint and cause the condition.An additional cause of hallux hammertoe is the absence of two small bones, called sesamoid bones, which are normally present beneath the big toe joint. There is an uncommon condition where a person may be born without these bones. More commonly however the absence of one or both of the sesamoid bones is due to their surgical removal. In the course of correcting a bunion deformity one of the sesamoid bones may be removed. In another situation, a fracture of one or both of the sesamoid bones may result in the necessity to remove them to cure the pain associated with the injury (See the description of sesamoditis).

A high arched foot may also result in the formation of, not only a hallux hammertoe, but also hammertoes of all of the toes.

A consequence of having a hallux hammertoe is irritation on the top of the toe from shoe pressure or the development of a painful callus on the end of the big toe. People who have had a stroke or who have diabetes with peripheral neuropathy may not have pain associated with the callus on the end of the toe. These areas may ulcerate and become infected.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of hallux hammertoe is made by clinical exam. An x-ray is useful in determining the degree of the deformity and the condition of the joint. The presence or absence of the sesamoid bones is also made using an x-ray. If a neurological condition has not been identified and there is absence of trauma or previous surgery in the area, then evaluation by a neurologist may be appropriate.

Treatment

The need for treatment is based upon the level of symptoms the patient may be experiencing. Splinting the toe in an attempt to straighten it is of little value and is certain to fail. If treatment is needed, surgical correction of the deformity has the greatest level of success.

If the deformity is flexible a simple tendon release procedure can be performed. This consists of making a small incision on the side of the toe and cutting the tendon in the bottom of the toe. If an ulceration or open sore is present on the end of the toe cutting the tendon to relax the toe may be all that is necessary to allow the ulceration to heal. This procedure can easily be performed in the doctor's office under a local anesthesia. Following the surgery a dressing is applied to splint the toe in a straightened position. The sutures and the bandage are kept in place for 7 to 10 days. The patient should keep their activities to a minimum during this period of time and keep the area dry. A post-operative type of shoe is worn to accommodate the bandage. Generally a patient can return to normal shoes within two weeks and resume complete normal activities in three weeks.

If the deformity is rigid then fusion of the joint will be necessary to correct the deformity. Under certain circumstances the foot surgeon may elect to fuse the toe when the deformity is flexible. Fusion of the toe requires removing bone at the level of the joint in the toe. The articular surfaces of the joint are removed and the two small bones are abutted up against one another and held in place by a small screw. This fuses the two pieces of bone together resulting in permanente straightening of the toe. This procedure is generally performed in an out-patient surgery center or hospital. The surgery can be performed under a local anesthesia but the patient and surgeon may prefer to use a twilight anesthesia for the patient's comfort. Following the surgery a fluff dressing is applied. The sutures will remain in place for 7 to 10 days. During this period of time the patient should significantly reduce their activities and keep their foot elevated. It takes 6 weeks or longer for the bones to fuse. During this period of time the patient should wear a stiffed-soled post-operative type of shoe. Bending of the toe will delay or inhibit the fusion of the bones. Quite often it takes three months before the patient can return to full-unrestricted activity.

Possible Complications

Possible complications include infection, excessive swelling, and delays in healing or failure of the bones to fuse. Overall the procedure has a very high success rate. On occasion, over time, the screw may begin the cause irritation on the tip of the toe and have to be removed.
Browse by:Foot DisordersAnkle DisordersLower Leg DisordersKnee Problems
The articles and content contained in this website are the exclusive property of PodiatryNetwork.com and PhysicianWebPages.com. Any reproduction or transfer to other websites or print publications without prior written consent is strictly prohibited.
Admin · 260 views · Leave a comment
17 Mar 2014 

Claw Toe-OrthoInfo - AAOS




Claw Toe-OrthoInfo - AAOS
Copyright 2012 American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsClaw ToePeople often blame the common foot deformity claw toe on wearing shoes that squeeze your toes, such as shoes that are too short or high heels. However, claw toe also is often the result of nerve damage caused by diseases like diabetes or alcoholism, which can weaken the muscles in your foot. Having claw toe means your toes "claw," digging down into the soles of your shoes and creating painful calluses. Claw toe gets worse without treatment and may become a permanent deformity over time.
SymptomsYour toes are bent upward (extension) from the joints at the ball of the foot.Your toes are bent downward (flexion) at the middle joints toward the sole of your shoe.Sometimes your toes also bend downward at the top joints, curling under the foot.Corns may develop over the top of the toe or under the ball of the foot.Top of pageEvaluation
If you have symptoms of a claw toe, see your doctor for evaluation. You may need certain tests to rule out neurological disorders that can weaken your foot muscles, creating imbalances that bend your toes. Trauma and inflammation can also cause claw toe deformity.
Top of pageTreatment
Claw toe deformities are usually flexible at first, but they harden into place over time. If you have claw toe in early stages, your doctor may recommend a splint or tape to hold your toes in correct position. Additional advice:
Wear shoes with soft, roomy toe boxes and avoid tight shoes and high-heels.Use your hands to stretch your toes and toe joints toward their normal positions.Exercise your toes by using them to pick up marbles or crumple a towel laid flat on the floor.
If you have claw toe in later stages and your toes are fixed in position:
A special pad can redistribute your weight and relieve pressure on the ball of your foot.Try special "in depth" shoes that have an extra 3/8" depth in the toe box.Ask a shoe repair shop to stretch a small pocket in the toe box to accommodate the deformity.
If these treatments do not help, you may need surgery to correct the problem.
Top of pageLast reviewed: September 2012


Co-Developed by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

AAOS does not endorse any treatments, procedures, products, or physicians referenced herein. This information is provided as an educational service and is not intended to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specific orthopaedic advice or assistance should consult his or her orthopaedic surgeon, or locate one in your area through the AAOS "Find an Orthopaedist" program on this website.Copyright 2012 American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsFoot and Ankle Exercise Conditioning Program

Download this PDFDownload this PDF(/PDFs/Rehab_Foot_and_Ankle_4.pdf)OrthoInfo
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
6300 N. River Road
Rosemont, IL 60018
Phone: 847.823.7186
Email: orthoinfo@aaos.org


Admin · 203 views · Leave a comment

Previous page  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next page